General Crafts

Redwork Embroidery Christmas Angel

Redwork Embroidery Christmas Angel
Christmas Calicos Pattern Pack

Supplies:
14″ square of unbleached muslin
large embroidery hoop
embroidery needles
your favorite shade of red embroidery floss
Christmas Calicos angel pattern
scrap booking gel pens
white acrylic craft paint
embroidered rose accent

Our great-grandmothers didn’t have acrylic paints and gel pens in their embroidery craft kit but we do!

So after you have finished your embroidery stitching get them out onto your craft table and have fun adding bits and accents of bright colors to the inside areas of your design.  You can use layers of gel pen colors to create intense color tones, add darker or lighter shades of gel pen over an area to make highlights and shadows … and even use different colors to make your own calico fabric patterns.

Some pale gel pens do require multiple colors.  For my white I chose to use acrylic craft paint.

If you get a little out of the line with the gels or if you have small openings in your stitch word, use a matching red gel pen to go over the embroidery floss.  Use embroidery patches, accent flowers, small bows and ribbons, and even tiny buttons to dress her up.

Once everything is completed and your redwork angel has dried over night, give it a nice ironing to permanent set the colors.  She is ready for her permanent hoop frame and to be placed on your mantel !!!!

 

Have fun ~ Lora

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Wood Carved Ice Fishing Decoys

During the  America Depression ice fishing decoys were a major way to put food on the table.  Today they are a fun, delightful carving subject that lends themself to brilliant coloring.  This post will look at a coloring/painting technique called Rouging, as shown on our middle red-orange metallic goldfish.

Below are three samples of ice fishing decoys, all worked off the general body shape of a comet goldfish.  Measuring between 6″ x 4″ to 7 1/2″ x 4″, worked in basswood, the top fish is sprayed with a copper metallic finish.  Our second fish has been roughed using oil paints and linseed oil over the same copper metallic, and the bottom fish is painted using craft acrylics over a lime green spray base.

 

Ice decoys were made from what ever materials the carver had on hand.  A scrap of wood, maybe an old license plate or piece of scrap metal for the fins, and roofing nails for the eye; these decoys are a major part of American folk art.

My carved samples are worked in basswood for the body shape.  The fins are cut from 30 gauge copper sheeting, which can easily be cut using a pair of craft scissors.

To insert the fins into the body I use my shading tip of my wood burning tool on my hottest temperature setting to literally burn a thin trough into the decoy.  While I have my burning unit on the table I can add small details to the body as scales, center lines, and even cross hatch patterns.

Remove any burned dust from your fin troughs then insert and set the copper fins with super glue.  To fill in the small gap between the burned trough and the metal fins I use Liquitex Modeling Paste – an air-dry polymer mixture that dries extremely hard without shrinking.   You can see the white line of modeling paste between the top fin and body, below.

After the decoy was thoroughly dry, sanded and dusted, I gave the fish two light coats of copper metallic spray paint.  Allow that primer layer to dry for several hours. I used t he spray paint as my base to avoid any brush strokes that might come from a hand-brushed primer.

Rouging is worked over a heavily antique project or a metallic base using artist oil paints, boiled linseed oil, and gloss acrylic spray sealer.

Place a small amount of each oil paint on a palette – I am using lemon yellow, cadmium yellow, cadmium orange, and cadmium red.  Oil paints are transparent colors that have no white, black, or gray base.  So as we work the color of the paint will clearly allow the color and sheen of the metallic spray to show through.

1  Lightly dampen your ox-hair brush in boiled linseed oil.  Blot as much of the oil off the brush as you can.  Next, pick up a very small amount of color on your brush tip.  I like to rub the color into the tip on the same area of paper towels as I just blotted the oil from my brush.

2  Gently rub one coat of linseed oil thinned color onto each area of your project.  I use a circular motion where the brush just barely touches the fish … just like applying your make-up rouge.  You should barely be able to see any color application with this first coat.  Let the oil paint dry for about 15 minutes.

3  Now, give your fish a light coat of gloss acrylic spray sealer.  Let the sealer dry for about 1/2 hour.

4  Repeat steps 1 through 3 over, and over, and over again.  And now repeat some more.

With each repeat you add an extremely thin layer of transparent oil color followed by a layer of gloss shine all on top of your metallic base.  The decoy below has about 8 to 10 coats at this stage.

 

The finished technique gives you this deep layering of bright color, sparkle and shine, that also allows the metallic sheen to come through the work.  This is similar to Chinese lacquer ware or enameling, in its effect.

For a little contrast I did add solid acrylic black eyes, black and white dots along the spine, and a little splatter of metallic gold paint to the fin ends.  With one last coat of gloss spray sealer this little bit of folk art is ready to hang.

 

 

 

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Wood Burned Pyrography Free Bird Pattern

This little “Let the Stress Begin” Bird Pattern for pyrography and wood carving is worked on a mini-clipboard that measures 6 1/2″ high by 4″ wide.  The outer 1/2″ edge of the clipboard was covered with painter’s tape after the pattern was traced.  This protects that area of wood from being burned and when it is removed you have a clean, straight-lined border.

This is a simple silhouette burn on a high setting for your wood burning tool for the bird’s outline and body fill.  The background grass was worked using a ball-tip pen on a medium temperature setting.

The white and yellow were added after the pyrography was completed using acrylic craft paints.  After they dry finish your wood burning using your favorite spray sealer.

Please click on the image above to open a new window with the full-sized – 7″ x 10″ – pattern.

Please click on the image above to open a new window with the full-sized – 7″ x 10″ – pattern.

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What would you like to do today?

Below are just a few of the ideas you will find here at LSIrish.com or at my carving-pyrography pattern website, ArtDesignsStudio.com.

So … what would you like to do today?

 

PYROGRAPHYWOOD CARVING
Pyrography Greenman Leather Bullet Journal CoverGreenman Leather Journal
free wood carving cane instructions by Lora IrishTwistie Stick Snake Carving
pyrography burned leather purseGreenman Slop Bag
Carving the Wood Spirit
Colored Pencil Portraits, Adult ColoringAdult Coloring E-Project
Mule Deer Relief Wood Carving Free ProjectMule Deer Relief Carving
woodcarving walking sticksCane Carving Patterns
Styles of Pyrography E-BookStyles of Pyrography
E-Project
wood burned leather jewelryLeather Necklace ProjectsGeneral measuring supplies for relief wood carving and whittling
Carving Tool Kit
Pyrography e-Project by Lora IrishMayan High Priest E-ProjectChip Carving e-Project by Lora IrishChip Carving Basics
Henna Tattoo Moon Face PlaqueHenna MoonFree Mountain Man Cane Pattern by Lora IrishFree Mountainman Project
Cross Crafting Wood Carving. Pyrography, and Scroll Saw Free ProjectSpoon Carving & Burning
Levels in Relief Carving
colored pencils and pyrographyColored Pencils in Pyro

 

chip carving game boardChip Carving Seminar
Celtic knot pyrography wood burning patternCeltic Knot Pyrography
Ice Fishing Decoys
Mushroom Doodles Pyrography ProjectMushroom DoodlesCeltic Dragon Wood Carving by Lora IrishCeltic Dragon Carving
Sampler Pattern Package
126 line art patterns
Free Lora Irish Mule Deer Carving PatternMule Deer Pattern Package

For more ideas, instructions, tutorials,
projects, and free patterns
check out the nav bars at the
top of this page, under the logo.

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