Gourd Art

What’s happening on our Pattern Site

Complete Pattern Collection

Pyrography Styles – Simple Outlining

Simply outlining the pattern is often our very first project in pyrography wood burning.  After decades as a pyrographer I still use this art style on many projects because of the clear, crisp impact you get by just following the tracing lines.  Also called line art, outlining is often used in engraving, etching, woodcut and lithography.  For more please read this great Wikipedia article.

Learn more about art styles that can be used in your pyrography wood burning – Pyrography Style Handbook is available at Amazon.com.

 

Very simple, very flat, and very two dimensional, a simple outline conveys your image without details or shading.

This dragon face is worked on a 3″ leather key fob.  Since he is both well detailed and worked in a very small space,  simple outlining is the perfect choice.

Please learn more about burning on leather, here at LSIrish.com.

 

 

 

The leather burned purse and the birch plywood burn, above, both use the same pattern from our pattern pack – Dragon Medallions.  It is the lack of shading and extra detailing in the leather purse image that makes the dragon a stronger design then the wood version.  The wood version almost has too much to see compared to the clean, crisp image on the leather.

 

Wood burning, especially on paper mache, leaves a physical impression in the media.  Santa’s outline literally drops down into the surface of this paper mache box.  The trough that comes from a simple outline stroke can also be used as a damn.  Here it works to stop the application of the acrylic craft paints from spreading into the background area.

Note on this little Santa, the background is not burned totally black.  Instead it is filled with the words, “ho ho ho!”

For more holiday and Christmas ideas to use with your simple outline style of wood burning, visit our holiday pattern category in our pattern site, ArtDesignsStudio.com.

I have one more fun simple outline styled work to share with you.  Its a Celtic deer design.  While the above samples all use carefully controlled, uniform thickness lines, this hart uses thick and thin lines.  As you move through the pattern make some areas of the line width thick then taper back to very thin.  This adds a little dimension without losing the crisp, line art effect.

 

 

LSIrish.com is an affiliate of Amazon.com – Pyrography Style Handbook

Here’s a fun patterns for the twisted tail Celtic Hart. Click on the image below to save to your desktop.

Pyrography Cleaning Graphite Tracing Lines

September 15, 2020

This morning I am working on getting your supply list ready for the Feathered Green Man Leather Journal Pyrography Project and came across a few photos on how to clean the graphite tracing lines from your wood burning project that I thought I would share.

I prefer to either use a  graphite tracing paper or graphite pencil lead rubbed over the back of my pattern my paper as my tracing media.  Graphite leaves a pale to medium gray line on our working surface that has no oil or wax, and therefore is not a permanent marking.

 

I do like to remove those tracing lines as early in the burning as is reasonable and will even do an extremely pale tonal value burned line before any shading work is done just so that I can erase the graphite right away.

A white artist eraser works wonderfully for wood and gourds.  These are our rougher wood burning surfaces.  Do not use an eraser that has any coloring ( that pink one on the end of your bright yellow #2 pencil) to it as the color dye can rub off onto your project.

An architect’s eraser pad – a fine mesh cloth bag filled with eraser grindings – is perfect for our finer medias as paper, leather, and chipboard (paper mache).  Since the eraser bag is flexible it works well for wood carvers that want to remove any carbon build-up from their wood burning details on the carving.

 

A dry ‘Magic’ eraser not only removes the graphite lines from your leather or wood project, it also picks up any oil and dirt that has been left from moving your hand across the surface.

In the photo sample above, Feathered Green Man Leather Journal Pyrography Project, I first cleaned the graphite tracing using my Architect’s eraser pad.  Then I followed up with a light cleaning using the dry ‘Magic’ eraser … and,wow!, was I surprised at how much more dirt I picked up …

That ‘Magic’ eraser is now a permanent addition to my pyrography tool kit.

 

Doodle Wind Chimes, Free Craft Project

Doodle Days #12 –  Wood Burn Spoons, Wood Carved Spoons, Leather Work, Free Lora S. Irish Patterns to Download, DIY Bookmaking, Bullet Journals, Scrap Booking, Card Making, Applique Quilting, Pyrography, Wood Carving

Irish Doodle Pin Cushion Wind Chime

Doodle Days Clay Pot Wind Chimes

This wind chimes will add a touch of country delight to your back porch.  Its quick, easy, and fun to make a large set using graduated sizes of clay pots.

Supplies:

3 1/2″ clay pot
2 1/2 yards of 1/2″ wide burlap ribbon
2 yards of thin gray-brown twine
3 1/2″ gold-colored bells
1 – 3/4″ twine bead
acrylic glue
1 – bamboo kitchen skewer
fine-point marking pen
gold glitter glue

Step 1:  Download your free doodle patterns, here at LSIrish.com.  To discover more free patterns type doodle into the search box in the header of this page.

Step 2: Using a fine-point permanent marking pen, doodle around the lower section of the outside of your clay pot.  For contrast, leave the rim of the pot without decoration.  Work over some of your pattern lines several times to create a thick-and-thin outline effect.

Step 3:  Wrap the thin twin around the bottom edge of the rim three times.  Tie the twine tightly.  Use a few drops of acrylic glue to hold the knot and twine into place.  Allow the glue to dry.

Step 4:  Cut a 2 yard long piece of thin twine.  Thread the three gold-colored bells onto the thread, and move them to the center point of the thread.  Bring the two ends of the thread together, tie a knot with the two  threads about 1 1/2″ above the bells.

Step 5: Slide one 3/4″ twine bead onto the two threads and position the bead above the knot made in step 4.  Tie a knot in the threads that sits on top of the bead.

This wind chimes follows the same step-by-step instructions as
our Doodle Wind Chimes.  The free doodles where printed
on card stock paper, cut, and double-stick taped into place.
This is a quick wedding decoration.

Step 6:  Tie the two twine threads into a third knot the height of your clay pot  away from the top of the bead.  If your clay pot is 3 1/2″ tall, this third knot is made 3 1/2″ away from the bead.

Step 7:  Cut two 1 1/4″ long pieces from the bamboo kitchen skewer.  Tie one piece with a knot tightly above the third knot.  Slide the twine, from the inside to the outside, through the hole in the bottom of the clay pot.  Lay the second bamboo piece between the two twine ends, on the bottom of the pot, and secure with a tight knot.  These two bamboo sticks hold the bell clapper in place.

Step 8:  Hold one end of the burlap ribbon between your thumb and the side of your palm.  Open your fingers as wide as possible.  Wrap the ribbon over your fingers four to five times, leaving at least a 4″ long end.

Step 9:  Carefully remove the wrapped burlap ribbon from your hand and place it, centered, between the two twine threads.  Tie a tight knot in the twine to secure the burlap ribbons.

Step 10: Tie a knot in the twine threads 4″ to 5″ from what is now the top of your wind chime.  Clip the ends to about 1/2″ long.

Step 11:  Working one burlap ribbon loop at a time, turn each loop inside-out.  This gives your ribbon that lovely curl.

Step 12:  Use gold glitter glue to add little dots of bright, sparkling accents to your doodle pattern.  Allow  the glue to dry thoroughly, and your wind chime is ready to hang.

free tracing pattern
Free Doodle Pattern #037
Irish Doodle Pin Cushion Wind Chime
Free Doodle Pattern #038

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irish Doodle Pin Cushion Wind Chime
Free Doodle Pattern #039

 

Landscape Pyrography Techniques and Projects by Lora S Irish

Scroll to Top